What to grow in February (Cool-Temperate climate)

 

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The Gawler Foundation herb garden in full bloom.

There is still a month of hot weather ahead, hopefully we won’t experience the extreme temperature fluctuations we had last month, which were not great for planting out vegetable seedlings. If you are planting seedlings this month remember to give them a regular deep soak with water and shade them from the afternoon sun.

If you have some empty spots in your vegetable beds, this month you could try planting seedlings of:

Red and Green Cabbages, Broccoli, Cauliflower (try beautiful Romanesco or Purple Cauliflowers) Brussel Sprouts, Kale, Leeks, Spring Onions, Silverbeet, Rainbow Chard, Asian greens (Bok Choy, Pak Choy, Tatsoi etc.), Lettuce, Celery.

You can also sow from seed direct into your vegetable beds:

Carrots, Beetroot, Parsnip, Turnips, Radish, Coriander, Rocket.

Remember to cover any seedlings from the Brassica family with insect netting for the next couple of months until the Cabbage White butterflies are no longer around or spray your seedlings regularly with Dipel (Bacillus thuringiensis).

 

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What to grow in December (Cool/Temperate Climate)

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I’ve been so busy with my garden at home and at work lately that before I knew it, the first week of December had already passed…so apologies for this late blog on what to grow this month. We’ve had a very high rainfall so far in December (a bit too much in some areas) and combined with the warmer temperatures, your vegetables should be growing right before your eyes.

If you’ve got some space left in your vegetable garden here’s what to grow this month:

You can plant: potatoes, tomatoes, tomatillos, cucumbers, capsicum, chillies, eggplant, zucchini, squash, spaghetti squash, pumpkin, corn, celery, cauliflower, broccoli, spring onions, lettuce, leeks, basil and other herbs.

You can sow from seed: kale, silverbeet, lettuce, beans (bush and climbing), beetroot, Asian greens, corn, cabbage, carrots, leek, spring onions, zucchini, squash, spaghetti squash, turnips, swedes, parsnips, smaller pumpkin varieties, cucumbers, perennial spinach, radishes, cauliflower, broccoli, kohlrabi and celery.

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What to grow in November (Cool/Temperate Climate)

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It’s 15ºC and raining outside on the first day of the last month of Spring. It’s just as well I’ve been too busy lately to get my summer vegetable seedlings planted early as the temperatures have been much cooler in our region this last month then they were this time last year.

The weather can be unpredictable sometimes and if you find that the early tomatoes, capsicums, eggplants etc. you planted on a beautiful sunny day in October are now shivering in an unexpected return of winter weather, you can always protect them with a mini greenhouse made from plastic bottles with the base cut out or some plastic plant guards until the warmer weather returns.

With the hope of sunny days ahead here’s what you can plant this month:

Potatoes, tomatoes, tomatillos, eggplants, capsicum, chillies, cucumbers, sweetcorn, celery, celeriac, globe artichokes, jerusalem artichokes, kale, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Asian greens (pak choy, bok choy, wombok etc.), carrots, beetroot, swedes, turnips, radishes, beans (climbing and bush), spring onions, leeks, yacon, perennial spinach, zucchini, pumpkins, squash, lettuce, rocket, mizuna, basil, parsley, coriander, chives and most other herbs…

…and of course lots of sunflowers to bring out the sun!

 

What to grow in October (Cool/Temperate climate)

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The warmer weather is finally here and now that the soil is also warming up you can get busy planting out your vegetable beds with a huge variety of vegetables and herbs.

Early October you can plant/sow:

Silverbeet, Rainbow Chard, Broccoli, Kohlrabi, Cauliflower, Asian greens, Cabbages, Spinach, Leeks, Lettuce, Celery, Endive, Spring onions, Radish, Carrots, Beetroot, Parsnip, Swede, Turnips, Peas, Snow peas, Rocket, Celeriac, Yacon, Potatoes and most herbs.

Late in October you can continue to sow/plant the vegetables listed above, as well as sow/plant into a warm part of the garden:

Tomatoes, Tomatillo, Cucumbers, Eggplant, Corn, Pumpkin, Squash, Bush and Climbing Beans, Chillies and Capsicums.

Note: This advice is based on my experience in growing vegetables in Melbourne’s Yarra Valley and Dandenong Ranges areas.

october seedlings

What to sow in September (Cool-Temperate Climate)

Spring seedlings

Nothing signals the arrival of spring more than blossoming fruit trees, a greenhouse bursting with vegetable seedlings waiting to be planted out and the birth of baby animals. However with a very cold winter behind us, don’t be too quick to plant out all your spring vegetable beds in the first week of spring, as we may have more cold weather to come. Staggering the sowing and planting of your crops throughout the growing season will also give you a more gradual harvest and helps to prevent getting caught with a glut of vegetables.

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Our new Spring chickens are still a bit camera shy!

It’s still too cold outside too for our new additions to the hen house and they are keeping warm inside the shed until the temperatures outside become a bit more pleasant and their feathers have fully grown.

There are lots of sowing calendars available online for different climate zones, but really the best way to learn what to sow in your own garden is to take the advice given and then experiment a bit with your garden’s own particular micro-climate. In my garden I might plant a particular vegetable in a different month of the season depending on whether it’s going into my front or backyard vegetable beds or in the greenhouse, as they all have very different micro-climates.

Spring

Parsnips and Red Chard

My work garden is a certified organic vegetable garden (with NASAA) so I’m required to keep notes on what I’ve sown, when I’ve sown it, how much I’ve sown and what garden bed it went into. For my own information I also add notes on how well things grew or if there was any unseasonal weather or pest/disease problems. It sounds like a lot of work but really it doesn’t take that much time at all to record it on a chart and it has become a valuable tool to look back on when planning what to sow the following year. You can do something similar for your home vegetable garden and over time this will allow you to see what does and doesn’t work and you’ll create your own sowing calendar. Remember too that each year is a bit different, weather and pest wise, so don’t be disheartened if something doesn’t grow well, take notes, learn and try again the following year.

Seedlings ready to plant

Here’s what seeds you may want to sow into punnets in September for planting out later in Spring:

Kohlrabi, Broccoli, Cauliflower, Cabbage, Asian Greens, Spinach, Silverbeet, Rainbow Chard, Leeks, Lettuce, Tomatoes, Tomatillos, Eggplant, Capsicum, Chillies, Cucumber, Zucchini, Pumpkin, Squash, Celery, Endive, Spring Onions.

You can also sow directly into your vegetable beds the seeds of:

Radish, Carrot, Beetroot, Parsnip, Swedes, Turnips, Spring Onions, Peas, Snow peas, Rocket and Endive

You can plant out seedlings of:

Kohlrabi, Broccoli, Cauliflower, Cabbage, Asian Greens, Spring Onions, Spinach, Silverbeet, Rainbow Chard, Leeks, Lettuce, Celeriac, Globe and Jerusalem Artichokes and Rhubarb.

September is also the time to plant more seed potatoes as well as most herbs.

Note: This advice is based on my experience in growing vegetables in Melbourne’s Yarra Valley and Dandenong Ranges areas.

What to sow in August (Cool-Temperate climate)

August garden

Late winter in my garden…

One more month of winter and relative calm in the garden to finish of some winter projects like my new garden/potting shed, the recycled wash station for my vegetables and yes, I’ve found another spot I can squeeze in and build one more raised vegetable bed. Once the warmer weather of Spring arrives there’ll be no more time for such projects as everything (including the lawn and the weeds) starts growing at a breakneck speed.

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I’m chitting my potatoes in egg cartons before planting them out

Late August in Melbourne is a great time to plant your first potato crop of the year (you can plant more potatoes right through to the end of December for successive crops). It’s also time to plant Jerusalem and Globe artichokes, shallots, onion seedlings, asparagus and rhubarb crowns.  You can sow into punnets for planting out in late September the seeds of; broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, silverbeet, rainbow chard, kale, celery, leeks, lettuce, mizuna, mibuna, spinach, bok choy, pak choy, wombok cabbage and any other Asian greens. August is also time to sow directly into the garden the seeds of; delicious sugar snap peas, snow peas, broad beans, turnips and swedes.

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Broad beans…I love them!

If you have a very warm spot, such as a greenhouse, and are impatient for spring to arrive, you could start sowing into punnets the seeds of tomatoes, capsicum, cucumber, pumpkin and eggplant for planting out mid Spring. They will need to be planted out into your warmest spot in the garden or they’ll just sit there until the soil warms up in late Spring. If you’re in a colder area wait until next month with these seeds.

If you have asparagus growing in your garden, keep a close eye on them…your first asparagus spears for the season should be popping up soon…Enjoy!

August seed sowing

What to grow in July (Cool-Temperate climate)

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The vegetable garden where I work at the Gawler Cancer Foundation.

The mornings here in the valley hover only just above freezing, but there are still the occasional days that the sun makes an appearance and being outdoors is a joy.

July is onion seedling planting time here in cool/temperate Australia. Onion seedlings can be planted as individuals or in little groups of three or four, if you prepare your soil well the developing onions will still get to full size and you’ll fit many more onions in a small space. It’s also time to plant spring onion seedlings and shallots now.

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If you have an established rhubarb patch that’s getting a bit crowded, you can dig up your rhubarb plants and divide them, planting divisions at least 50cm apart. Leftover divisions make great presents for friends or neighbours. If you’re not already growing rhubarb, July is a good time to buy some crowns and plant them out in your garden.

rhubarb

Who doesn’t love freshly harvested asparagus? If you’ve never munched on an asparagus harvested straight from the garden, do yourself a favour and buy some asparagus crowns to plant now. Asparagus crowns are a small investment that, when looked after well, will give you fresh asparagus for the next 20 years!

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Lastly, if you still have some space in the garden for more vegetables you can plant out seedlings of Globe artichokes or tubers of Jerusalem artichokes.

 

 

What to plant in June (Cool-Temperate climate)

 

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My greenhouse increases the variety of crops that I can grow over winter…and is a great place to potter on a cold, wet winter’s day.

June, being the start of winter and cooler weather, marks the start of a quieter time in the vegetable garden. There are some crops though that need to be planted now; it’s time to sow onion seed (brown, red, white and spring onions), sow a succession crop of english spinach, broad beans, snow peas and broccoli (in punnets). It’s also time to divide or plant asparagus crowns which are now dormant, as well as rhubarb, artichokes (Jerusalem and globe), shallots and chives.

If you are fortunate enough to have a greenhouse with vegetable beds to extend your growing season, then you can still plant out any of the seedlings from the May planting list into these beds. Lettuce, rocket and other salad greens as well as herbs such as dill, chervil, parsley and coriander will all thrive and give a regular harvest over winter in this protected environment.

 

 

Eat your greens…and reds…and purples…

salad leaf identification

When growing your own, there is no excuse for a bland and boring salad. Above is a chart highlighting some of the salad leaves I’ve grown over the years to add both colour and flavour to our salads at home and at work. There are many more varieties to try and many will also have edible flowers that can add colour and interest to a salad. Best of all most salad leaves can be grown year round in Melbourne. What is your favourite salad leaf combination?