What to grow in February (Cool-Temperate climate)

 

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The Gawler Foundation herb garden in full bloom.

There is still a month of hot weather ahead, hopefully we won’t experience the extreme temperature fluctuations we had last month, which were not great for planting out vegetable seedlings. If you are planting seedlings this month remember to give them a regular deep soak with water and shade them from the afternoon sun.

If you have some empty spots in your vegetable beds, this month you could try planting seedlings of:

Red and Green Cabbages, Broccoli, Cauliflower (try beautiful Romanesco or Purple Cauliflowers) Brussel Sprouts, Kale, Leeks, Spring Onions, Silverbeet, Rainbow Chard, Asian greens (Bok Choy, Pak Choy, Tatsoi etc.), Lettuce, Celery.

You can also sow from seed direct into your vegetable beds:

Carrots, Beetroot, Parsnip, Turnips, Radish, Coriander, Rocket.

Remember to cover any seedlings from the Brassica family with insect netting for the next couple of months until the Cabbage White butterflies are no longer around or spray your seedlings regularly with Dipel (Bacillus thuringiensis).

 

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What to grow in December (Cool/Temperate Climate)

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I’ve been so busy with my garden at home and at work lately that before I knew it, the first week of December had already passed…so apologies for this late blog on what to grow this month. We’ve had a very high rainfall so far in December (a bit too much in some areas) and combined with the warmer temperatures, your vegetables should be growing right before your eyes.

If you’ve got some space left in your vegetable garden here’s what to grow this month:

You can plant: potatoes, tomatoes, tomatillos, cucumbers, capsicum, chillies, eggplant, zucchini, squash, spaghetti squash, pumpkin, corn, celery, cauliflower, broccoli, spring onions, lettuce, leeks, basil and other herbs.

You can sow from seed: kale, silverbeet, lettuce, beans (bush and climbing), beetroot, Asian greens, corn, cabbage, carrots, leek, spring onions, zucchini, squash, spaghetti squash, turnips, swedes, parsnips, smaller pumpkin varieties, cucumbers, perennial spinach, radishes, cauliflower, broccoli, kohlrabi and celery.

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What to grow in November (Cool/Temperate Climate)

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It’s 15ºC and raining outside on the first day of the last month of Spring. It’s just as well I’ve been too busy lately to get my summer vegetable seedlings planted early as the temperatures have been much cooler in our region this last month then they were this time last year.

The weather can be unpredictable sometimes and if you find that the early tomatoes, capsicums, eggplants etc. you planted on a beautiful sunny day in October are now shivering in an unexpected return of winter weather, you can always protect them with a mini greenhouse made from plastic bottles with the base cut out or some plastic plant guards until the warmer weather returns.

With the hope of sunny days ahead here’s what you can plant this month:

Potatoes, tomatoes, tomatillos, eggplants, capsicum, chillies, cucumbers, sweetcorn, celery, celeriac, globe artichokes, jerusalem artichokes, kale, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Asian greens (pak choy, bok choy, wombok etc.), carrots, beetroot, swedes, turnips, radishes, beans (climbing and bush), spring onions, leeks, yacon, perennial spinach, zucchini, pumpkins, squash, lettuce, rocket, mizuna, basil, parsley, coriander, chives and most other herbs…

…and of course lots of sunflowers to bring out the sun!

 

What to grow in July (Cool-Temperate climate)

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The vegetable garden where I work at the Gawler Cancer Foundation.

The mornings here in the valley hover only just above freezing, but there are still the occasional days that the sun makes an appearance and being outdoors is a joy.

July is onion seedling planting time here in cool/temperate Australia. Onion seedlings can be planted as individuals or in little groups of three or four, if you prepare your soil well the developing onions will still get to full size and you’ll fit many more onions in a small space. It’s also time to plant spring onion seedlings and shallots now.

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If you have an established rhubarb patch that’s getting a bit crowded, you can dig up your rhubarb plants and divide them, planting divisions at least 50cm apart. Leftover divisions make great presents for friends or neighbours. If you’re not already growing rhubarb, July is a good time to buy some crowns and plant them out in your garden.

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Who doesn’t love freshly harvested asparagus? If you’ve never munched on an asparagus harvested straight from the garden, do yourself a favour and buy some asparagus crowns to plant now. Asparagus crowns are a small investment that, when looked after well, will give you fresh asparagus for the next 20 years!

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Lastly, if you still have some space in the garden for more vegetables you can plant out seedlings of Globe artichokes or tubers of Jerusalem artichokes.

 

 

What to plant in June (Cool-Temperate climate)

 

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My greenhouse increases the variety of crops that I can grow over winter…and is a great place to potter on a cold, wet winter’s day.

June, being the start of winter and cooler weather, marks the start of a quieter time in the vegetable garden. There are some crops though that need to be planted now; it’s time to sow onion seed (brown, red, white and spring onions), sow a succession crop of english spinach, broad beans, snow peas and broccoli (in punnets). It’s also time to divide or plant asparagus crowns which are now dormant, as well as rhubarb, artichokes (Jerusalem and globe), shallots and chives.

If you are fortunate enough to have a greenhouse with vegetable beds to extend your growing season, then you can still plant out any of the seedlings from the May planting list into these beds. Lettuce, rocket and other salad greens as well as herbs such as dill, chervil, parsley and coriander will all thrive and give a regular harvest over winter in this protected environment.